Anything Photoshop or Photography

HOW TO CREATE SCANNED PHOTOSHOP BRUSHES

Image of a young lady daydreamingAs you know, I am a major Photoshop brush fanatic. This week I am doing a quick blog on creating brushes from scanned marks  and then turning them into brushes. I am finding it so handy to have these brushes for detail or grunge effects for areas that need just a little more subtle texture. So here are the steps I am finding useful for creating this type of brush.

Creating the Brushes

  1. Need to create some square marks on paper – in my case an inexpensive Sketch Pad from WalMart that is good for Pen, Pencil, Pastel and Oil Pastel was used. 10 different marks were created on the page as shown below. All but the Pencil Brush mark were created using an inexpensive set of Faber Castell Black India Ink artists pens sized to S (0.3 mm), F (o.5 mm), M (0.7 mm), and B (1.8 mm) – any of their sets look pretty nice. Any type of media could be used here.
  2. Scan the whole document as a JPG at 600 dpi. Below is the scanned document with some explanatory text added for blog.
  3. Bring scanned document into PS and increase the brightness with Levels Adjustment (CTRL+L) or Curves Adjustment (CTRL+M) to make sure the background is white – the scanner tends to darken the whites as seen below.
  4. Select each mark with the Marquee Tool and put on its own layer (CTRL+J). More contrast can be added here if the mark is still not as dark as needed by using the same Levels or Curves Adjustments.
  5. One by one, toggle each layer on with the others off and create brush by going to Edit -> Define Brush Preset and name it.
  6. Once created, add different settings in the Brush Panel to make different effects. I experimented with all the marks, but only kept the labeled brushes shown below. Some just do not work out well.

Scanned Ink and Pencil marks for PS BrushesMy favorite brush in this group turned out to be the Pencil Brush which was just a basic pencil scribble. In Image 1 above the green soft vertical lines that seem to stretch the columns out is from this brush effect. Image 2 below is another example of using this brush. (For both image details see end of blog.) By making a few changes in the Brush Panel, a new brush called Pencil Thin Vert Lines brush was created. Using this I was able to create a very nice vertical effect for use below extracted objects. (Here are the settings used if you would like to create a similar brush: Brush Tip – used Pencil Brush mark, Size was huge – usually have to reduce it as it came in as 2955 px, Angle set to 90 degrees (makes strong vertical lines), Roundness 12%, and Spacing 10%; Shape Dynamics Size Jitter Control set to Pen Pressure and both the Flip X Jitter and Flip Y Jitter boxes are checked; and Smoothing section checked.) 

Here are steps to create a handy PNG file from a layer in a document that would be nice to use in other images.

Turn a Layer with a Brush Effect into a PNG File

  1. Highlight the layer in the Layer Panel.
  2. Right click and choose Duplicate the Layer.
  3. In dialog in Destination Document drop-down, select New to create a new document.
  4. Just this layer appears in the New Document that can be saved as a PNG file. For the Vertical Pencil effect, I saved it in my Library Panel for quick use.

Sketch of a New Zealand Flower The Duplicate Layer command also my favorite way to move layers between files with lots of layers – none of this dragging with the Move Tool. In the Destination Document drop-down, select the document to move layer(s) into instead of New and of course do not save as a PNG. Hope this will give you some ideas on creating your own unique brushes – I am going to try scanning in some crayon marks and also some watercolor marks. By making changes in the Brush Panel, lots of subtle texture effects can be created. Have a good week!…..Digital Lady Syd

Digital Lady Syd Related Blogs:
How to Enjoy the Doodle!

Image Info:

Image 1: This image turned out to be very complicated and several iterations were created before I settled on this look. I first began with the beautiful model image called peach2 by faestock and extracted her from her background using the Select and Refine command. She was duplicated and put in the background at 35 % layer opacity and at a smaller size to get the two face look. The hair was thickened by using my basic SJ Pastel 3 brush (see How to Create My Favorite Brush blog.) The floral headband is from Carousellerie Creative Pinkish Blooms Arrangement Wreath 04 – Free Transform (CTRL+T) was used to adjust it to her head. The background was added – starting with 2 Lil’ Owls (for website link see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog) Making Waves 2 texture. Then the column was extracted from the Ancient Ruins IV by Pelleron at DeviantArt and taken into Topaz Impression2 using my Colored Pencil preset. (Started with Colored Pencil II preset and ended up with these settings:  Stroke Brush Type 07, Brush Size 0.90, Paint Volume 0.77, Paint Opacity 0.20, Stroke Width -0.82, Stroke Length -0.25, Spill 0.26, Smudge 0.16, and Coverage 1.00; Color Overall Sat 0.37, and Red Hue 0.78, Red Sat 0.32 and Red Lightness 0.28; Lighting Brightness 0.21 and Contrast -0.40, Light Direction X: 1.00 and y: 1.00; and Texture Strength 0.33, Size 0, Paper I texture and white background.). Next the Pencil Brush was turned into a PNG object to add the effect on a layer underneath to add a very vertical grunge look. On top of the model an Orange vertical light leak was added on the right side and some Gold Dust Glitter by Alaina Jensen added on top of her head. A Watercolor Wedding Collection flower bunch by Lisa Glanz was added down the right side of the image. French Kiss (see my Tidbits Blog for website link) Tableaux Fresco texture was applied and set t0 54% layer opacity – a layer mask was added and the model and some more center areas were painted out. Kim Klassen’s Downtown II Collection Isobel (could not find link) was added at 48% layer opacity and set to Soft Light Blend Mode. On top 2 Lil’ Owls Comos 11 texture was desaturated and set to Overlay blend mode for the star effect. The Bumble Bee brush his from fartoolate at DeviantArt. The text is from Robert Louis Stevenson. There were lots of adjustment layers in this file also.

Image 2: I actually had posted this image a few weeks ago using a different color palette. Here is some of the blog post from my Tidbits Blog. This pretty flower is from an old album called Illustrations of the New Zealand Flora (Plate 139) published in 1914. It was just a black and white line drawing and I added the color and texture. The image was removed from a page in the downloaded PDF file using the steps in my How to Create Vintage Text for Images Fun Photoshop Blog -just go towards the end for steps to pull images. I am afraid I took a little color liberty here as the volume says the flowers are actually white, but I liked the pink color. The flowers pink color was created by using a Curves Adjustment Layer’s individual Red channel with the layer mask filled with black (CTRL+I in the mask) – just painted in the pink on the petals – layer was set to Color blend mode. On a separate blank layer under the outline, painted in the green textures using Grut’s I Qwillo (I love this brush for drawing and painting!) and a Mixer blender to paint in the leaves and stem. Below that but above a white background layer a texture layer was painted – just experimented with a couple of my brushes (the Pencil Brush from above for the vertical lines and the squares are a brush that was created from Subtle Grunge Texture 10 – Cement texture 10 by Spoongraphics).  Took just the texture layer into Topaz Studio (see my Introducing the Free Topaz Studio blog) and sidebar at my Tidbits Blog for free download. The Radiance filter was applied so the fine lines showed up – I thought it matched the line drawing effect of the flower. The font is Viner Hand ITC and an Outer Glow layer style with a Contour change was used to make the text stand out. Used a Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer to set the background texture color. The original flower outline was set to 15% layer opacity at the top of the layer stack. That was it.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s