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Posts tagged “Photoshop Painting

REBLOG – HOW TO USE PHOTOSHOP’S BRUSH TEXTURE SECTION FOR PAINTING CLEAN-UP

Image of three painted birds on a branch

Since I have not been taking a lot of images recently, I decided to practice some painting in Photoshop. The image above is one I experimented with using what I hope looks like a bit of a Fall background scene. These birds were mainly painted using PS Mixers – mostly the blenders at different sizes and shapes. Check out some of the Converted Legacy Tool Presets – Default Tool Presets (open the top left pop out and select) to get some really nice brushes to start some painting. (Check out the Blunt – Round Blender and Fan – Flat Blender – I have used both mixer blenders to paint images – try adjusting the Size and some of the Options Bar settings for different results.) If you change some brush settings and like the results, be sure to save the preset to keep those settings. There is definitely a bit of trial-and-error and so much depends on the image. I was not too sure how these birds would turn out, but I think they are fine. It is very relaxing to paint also. Well, hope you are enjoying cruising into the wonderful Fall weather. I hope to get going on those Halloween pix soon!…..Digital Lady Syd

Image of painted purple hydrangeaI have been painting in Corel Painter more but finding I just have to use Photoshop to finish up most of my work. This can be frustrating because as we all know, Painter excels with their hundreds of brushes and usually the strokes and dabs look much better when created in Painter. Therein lies my dilemma. How do I clean up some mis-strokes when I am in PS so that you can’t tell the clean up was done.

I have been working on a brush all week and a lot of the best results came from the PS Brush Panel’s Texture section settings. If you understand this section, you can create some really nice brushes for smoothing out hard edges or blending texture into a big splotches of paint.

Some Important Brush Panel Notes:

  • The Brush Panel in Photoshop is often called the Brush Engine as it is in Painter.
  • Also when creating a new brush, be sure to actually click on each brush section name to open it up. By clicking on the check box, the existing settings from the last brush used will be applied to it. This can wreak havoc on a brush!
  • Texture and Pattern can mean the same thing, depending on what you are doing in Photoshop (and Painter). A texture is really a texture that you are adding in as a layer to an image and usually have .jpg or .png file extensions. A texture can be a pattern when using the Paint Panel’s Texture Section, the swatches as shown below are actually patterns and will have a .pat extension. To convert a texture to a pattern, open the Texture in PS, and to a Pattern, go to Edit -> Define Pattern – a Rectangular Marquee Selection can be made of just part of the texture to use as a pattern also. It will now appear at the end of your Patterns list.

Brush Panel Texture Section Basics

Below is what the Texture section looks like when the brush created was used to clean up the above hydrangea image. See My Pastel Brush Settings section below for all the original brush settings – it is a favorite of mine to just paint with, without these Texture settings. The new settings are also listed again if you would like to create the brush.
Screenshot of Brush Panel Texture SectionAs you can see in the image, the Painter strokes created a lot of differing and textured swirls within this image. When the image was opened in Photoshop for final processing, I looked at the strokes more closely. Several looked too sharp – too much bristle or sketch-looking lines – and did not blend well with the other parts of the image.

The brush created was for adding texture into painted areas to either soften edges or add some interest. This is done in PS by adding one of the same patterns already listed in the drop-down (click on down arrow to left of pattern swatch to open up).  This is the same pattern list used with the Pattern Fill Adjustment Layer, Layer Style Pattern Overlay Section, Bevel & Emboss Texture Section, and Stroke Section. Here are a few of my Obsidian Dawn patterns shown in my drop-down list below.
Screenshot of pattern drop-down Menue in Texture SectionA colored pattern can work in the brush if it has lots of contrast, which is determined not by the color saturation but the light and dark tones. The black and white patterns seem to be the best choices. The texture used in this brush was called 12 and the link is in brush settings section below. The pattern had a nice contrast to it and created an interesting texture in the stroke. The pattern may not be visible in the stroke preview at all until the following section sliders are adjusted.

The Scale can be adjusted to get a bigger or smaller pattern size. If you make it too small, a repeat pattern line in larger brush strokes may be seen, so watch out for this. When the pattern is added and no change is visible, try adjusting the Brightness slider first and watch the Preview for a change. The Contrast can help but it is not usually as noticeable. The Mode can make a big difference. Try all the different modes as they sometimes give drastically different results. The Preview will show these differences. The Depth, Minimum Depth (must set a Control to use this slider), and Depth Jitter (randomness) sliders can also add some major texture contrast, especially on the edge of the stroke. Overall adding texture to a brush requires a lot of tweaking, but when you get a good result, it is so rewarding and helpful to have.

How to Paint with This Brush

Now that you have a brush you like, here are a couple little tips for using it. Since you are using a texture (pattern) in your brush, it can make your computer use a lot of ram to keep up with your stroking since most of the time the Texture Each Tip box is on. This means it is applying the texture to each stroke laid down. Try increasing the spacing just a bit – usually this will not make a very noticeable change and speeds up the stroking. Since I have an older computer, CS6 runs much smoother when painting with a textured brush. It can also help to change your image to 8-bit mode if having problems.

Next point, if you want to just smooth some of the strokes with this brush, sample the color you are painting on (ALT+click on spot). If you want to add a little texture to the stroke, just sample a similar color nearby or go a lighter or darker using the color swatch. This is how I mainly added the soft color in some of the larger areas of this image. This brush can be used without the Texture Section checked to make a much more smooth stroke for color clean up or sharp edges.

Sometimes a funny color results if you are painting on a layer that is underneath an adjustment layer. That’s because you are technically sampling All Layers even though it is not shown in the Options Bar. Either need to turn off the adjustment layers above and sample the colors before the adjustments layers were added, or create a stamped version (CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+E) on top and then add the New Layer for painting on. Now the sampled colors will be as you adjusted them. The stamped layer can then be deleted but the colors will stay correct.

Why Not Use the Smudge Brush or the Mixer Brush?

The Smudge brush does some wonderful things, but there is no access to the Texture Section in the Brush Panel for Smudge brushes (only Basic Tip Shape and Shape Dynamics can be adjusted with a Smudge Brush and no color can be laid down, only get blending). The Mixer brushes work very well but I find it takes a lot of experimenting to get the exact stroke needed. Since what I needed was a quick little clean up brush, this seemed a bit like over-kill unless it is needed for some fine art.

My Pastel Brush Settings

I really like the shape of this brush – as a starter it is very textured and makes a nice subtle rough edge with the dab. The new brush used in my image and in this blog was called SJ Pastel 3-painting texture adder2 (I do not remember why I named it Pastel 3 since it used their Pastel 11???). Both the new brush and my original brush (called SJ Pastel 3 Use) used this wonderful dab (tip shape of brush – similar to a captured dab type in Painter) can be found in SDW Pastel Brushes set as Pastel 11 brush. I listed my settings. I also created brushes using their Pastel 5 brush – try this one out for a good experiment – slightly different dab shape. I am not exactly sure this qualifies as a true pastel brush since the Erodible Tips are often used for pastel effects.

Brush Tip Shape:
Size: It opens up at a huge 2130 px brush! Here are the settings for the other sections so you can create the same brush or use this one to try and create some better results. The original SJ Pastel 3 brush was set to 35 pixels in size. For this painting brush, the size is set to 8 pixels. I like to use a small size for clean up and this can be adjusted easily.
Angle – 137 degrees – change by moving the little circle with the arrow around
Roundness – 100% – change by moving the little dots on circle inward
Spacing – 35%

Shape Dynamics:
Size Jitter – 17% but Control on Fade
Minimum Diameter 23%
Angle Jitter – 42% and Control Off
All other settings at 0.

Texture:  For SJ Pastel 3 Use (original brush)
Pattern in drop-down:  Rough, located in PS Erodible Textures
Scale – 87%
Brightness – (-45)
Contrast – 0
Check Texture Each Tip
Mode – Multiply
Depth – 50%
Depth Jitter – 1%

Texture:  For SJ Pastel 3-painting texture adder2 (new painting brush)

Used was Pattern 21 from Obsidian Dawn’s SS-grungy-dirty-patterns set. Check out her website – one of my favorites for brushes and everything Photoshop and some good tutorials are also available.
Scale – 87%
Brightness – 101
Contrast – 60
Check Texture Each Tip
Mode – Height
Depth – 36%
Depth Jitter – 55%

Smoothing:  Always leave toggled on

Options Bar Settings

For beginning setting, the brush Options Bar shows a Mode of Normal, Opacity 67% and Flow 100% for both brushes. Need to be careful. If your brush does not act correctly, take a peek up at these settings to make sure they are set correctly.

I usually save these brushes as both Brush Tool Presets and Brush Presets. Also go into the Preset Manager and save them on your hard drive so if you lose them accidentally, they can be restored easily.

Pink Wildflowers image These pretty little wildflowers were growing on my deck a while back. They were painted in PS using the original My Pastel Brush, and then clean up using the new SJ Pastel 3 brush from above. The background was painted in Painter and added over the image. There was a lot of clean up in this image, but overall it came out pretty much how I wanted it to look.

I hope you get a chance to try out the brush and experiment making your own. It can really help to clean up those over-looked Painter mistakes without having to go back and forth into the different programs. Also it works great when painting in PS as in the wildflower image, with and without the Texture Section turned on, to clean up the layers below.


WHERE TO FIND A GOOD PHOTOSHOP PAINTER

Digital Drawing/Painting of a Young LadyJust popping onto my blog to go over a fun painting/drawing technique I attempted recently. This young lady is an illustration I drew in Photoshop only using the reference stock photo from Little Girl Stock as a guide – no painting over the image. This is my first attempt at digitally drawing an image. I made it of a little older young lady as it fit what I felt like drawing. I am learning this technique from David Belliveau and his Paintable website, who had a One Week Portrait Class with lots of videos and brushes. I found the whole thing very addictive – who knew I could actually create an illustrated portrait??? For a quick overview of what he does, check out his Digital Painting Walkthrough: Portrait Tips & Tricks video. If you are interested in downloading some good Photoshop painting brushes, check out his How to Paint Realistic Eyes: The Ultimate Guide video. It includes a set of 14 brushes and 1 Smudge Tool preset (which I really love) to go along with this tutorial (but also will work on any painting project). The video goes over a short example of painting eyes that follows the same basic steps of his digital painting program.

This image took a long time to complete and lots of mistakes were made along the way. I am not sure when David will be running another one of his Portrait classes. He has so many videos posted on YouTube that it would be pretty easy to learn. I tried to paint another example for this blog, but it just is not ready to present. It is a very time-consuming process. I can see this definitely takes a lot of practice. And even though I liked David’s brushes, some of my other painting brushes worked really well. I created a group of Portrait Painting Brushes in the Brush Preset Panel. There some of David’s brushes were added along with several of my favorite Grut Brushes (Grut-I Qwillo-my favorite drawing brush for sketching, and Grut-My Dehy-good texture brush especially nice for skin and eye irises). In the meantime, if you are interested in trying out this type of digital painting, check out David’s You Tube videos where he has lots of great information posted. I think he is an excellent teacher and a lot can be learned. Enjoy your week – I am going to be painting another person!…..Digital Lady Syd


SOME FLOWER POWER

Digitally painted image of flower on a purple backgroundJust doing a quick post this week. Thought I would pass on just a couple thoughts on doing a digital painting. I find that when I am painting that either the Color Panel (set to Hue Cube – click the pop out in upper right corner to see other options) or Coolorus is open on the left side of my screen so colors in the same color palette can be selected very quickly by just clicking in the color areas. Coolorus is an inexpensive add-on for Photoshop CS6 and up. The Color Wheel  and the Mixer section Swatches, Color History, and Shades & Tones strips are all kept open so all you do is choose a color you want by clicking in it with your brush. For painting with the mixer brushes, the Current Brush Load needs to be set to Load Solid Color Only in the drop-down toggle menu. Then colors can be sampled using the ALT+click in the Mixer brushes also.

These are some of my favorite painting brushes I am using right now for most of my Photoshop painting. For this image the purple color was used as the major color and the rest of colors were mainly complementary greens. First started out with a purple background color – used a new Paint Bucket Tool preset by Grut (for website see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog) called FI Paper Deeds. On a layer above just drew a rough sketch of the leaves using Grut’s I Qwillo brush (one of my favorite drawing brushes!). Then painted in the leaves underneath using Gruts NM Pans Attic and OI Shiff Din brushes – made the brushes much smaller and just kept blending the colors using both brushes. The white flowers were painted in using my SJ 3 Pastel Van Gogh TI1 brush (see below for settings) and turned off the Color Dynamics sections to paint in centers. My sharp line texture png was added underneath and some green grass with flower were added that I had painted previously. Then a stamped layer was created (CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+E) and Topaz (for website see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog) Impression 2 where Rembrandt Portrait II preset was applied a little. Then on a New Layer the fence was drawn, Jai Johnson’s flying birds png was added and set to 23% layer opacity. Two text layers were created – one used Castile Inline Grunge font and the other a font called Chiller. Used one of my painted borders created a long time ago. Some little spatter marks were created using Grut’s FX Flick Tub brush. A purple light leak I created a while back was added to the right side of the image and one of Sebastian Michaels borders was added on top. Finished up the photo with Nik Viveza 2, and a Red Channel Luminosity Adjustment Curve. See my Related Blogs for more info on some of the techniques used above.

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Digitally painted Purple-Pink FlowersThis digitally painted image above is using the same basic workflow as above. I used a couple different brushes on the flowers and leaves, but overall pretty much the same results. The major trick is to find a brush to remove some of the sketch work without losing the definition of the petal. I used a mixer on this one to soften those lines. The mixer brush layer was lowered to add back in some of the texture in the leaves and blossoms. And definitely a lot of brush size variations to add detail versus smoothing. Underneath all the painting and sketch layers, Kim Klassen’s Dream texture (not sure it is still available) was added and set to 46% layer opacity (on top of a white background layer). The frame is from one of my Double Edged Frames layer styles that can be downloaded on DeviantArt.  Lots of fun but it does take some time to get a nice overall effect. My sketches were so rough looking it is amazing to me that it all pulls together.

Have a nice week and try a little illustration even if you are not that great at it. It is a lot of fun to try different Photoshop brushes and see what turns out……Digital Lady Syd

Brush Settings for SJ 3 Pastel Van Gogh TI1 brush: To make your own, follow my How to Create my Favorite Brush blog but with a couple important changes. First a small square was selected using the Marquee Tool showing a part of the plant Impression layer that showed some nice contrast and brush strokes in it. It was turned into a Pattern by going to Edit -> Define Pattern and name it. (I named mine TI Van Gogh). Next the Brush Panel Texture section was opened. Select the Pattern drop-down (little arrow on right side of pattern swatch) and go to the very bottom where the new Pattern is located. The setting for the pattern I created are: Scale 46%, Brightness -46, Contrast 34, check Texture Each Tip, Mode Color Dodge, Depth 38% and Depth Jitter 12%. Try adjusting all these settings to fit your particular pattern. This brush gives a nice stroke effect at both larger and smaller sizes. Then open the Color Dynamics section and check Apply per Tip, set the Hue Jitter to 2%, and Brightness Jitter to 11%.

Digital Lady Syd Related Blogs:
How to Create My Favorite Brush
How to Create Scanned Photoshop Brushes
How to Create Light Leaks to use Over Again
How To Make Frames or Borders
How to Use a Red Channel to Create a Nice Blended Image Effect


DIGITAL LADY SYD SPEAKS OUT ON TOPAZ IMPRESSION

Image of flowers using Topaz Impression pluginThis is not a formal review of Topaz (see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog for website link) Impression due to some  constraints on my time right now, but I did want to give a quick shout out to them for creating for us Photoshop Lovers a new plug-in to fan our “flair for the artistic.” This is Topaz’s first attempt at making a painterly program – it is in a tough competition at this point since painting seems to be all the rage. I have had the opportunity to play around with this little gem for a few weeks and can say that once again, Topaz has a way of creating those little extras which makes you say – oh yeah, that’s really a nice feature!

Two things I really like about this program:

  • There is usually not really a lot that needs to be done to make the resulting image much better after applying one of the various presets they have created. I have played around with all the different sliders and settings, and find that adjusting the Stroke brush types is my personal favorite. All the Stroke sliders are really good so it is hard to choose a favorite from them.
  • My second really favorite item is that you can change the Hue, Saturation and Lightness of all the individual colors – this makes a huge difference depending on what colors you want to emphasize in the image. There are little red diagonal lines over the areas affected when hovering over each color with your mouse which is very helpful. (Something else I have never seen before.) Topaz has always been a leader in the way color is managed in their plug-ins. ReStyle set the bar very high for other software creators in this regard and Impression is continuing on with this tradition.

The image above was my first attempt at using Impression and I was totally surprised at how nice it turned out with very little manipulation. This image used one of their early Painting presets so the settings names do not match what was released but I know one of the new Painting presets is very close. I did set the image to Screen blend mode at 82% opacity – it gave a really nice finished look. I also used the Type 06 brush. Switch these brushes up and try different ones with the presets – you get some totally different results! The only other thing done after applying Impression was to use Topaz Detail 3 to sharpen up the focal points (the lower flower and secondary one is the pink and yellow one in the center). A black layer mask was applied (hold down ALT while pressing the layer mask icon in the Layers Panel) and just the centers were lightly painted back in. That was it!

Image of Clouds from my Front Porch with Topaz Impressions applied This little cloud image above was taken with my Android from my front porch here in Florida – got to love our skies! Used the Impression Pointillism II preset and made the follow changes to the preset: Stroke Brush Type 05, Brush Size 0.61, Paint Volume (Thickness) 0.27, Paint Opacity 1.00 (this really made the Impasto pop), Stroke Width -0.04, Stroke Length 0.11, Spill 0.14, and Smudge 0.05;  and in Color the Blue Saturation and Lightness were adjusted to give the sky a little more interest. These settings are a little rough since they were developing some of the settings for the program at the time this image was created. But the important thing is that by changing the brush types and those sliders in the Stroke section, some really interesting looks can be achieved. In the above I was leaning toward the bluish tones for the sky so that is what was adjusted. I even love the little stroke effects in the bushes in the foreground. Back in Photoshop there was not much extra work done except to add a selective color adjustment layer (Colors Whites – Yellow -7%, Neutrals Black +5, and Blacks Magenta +4, Yellow +9, and Black -7) – sort of  like adjusting blacks, midtones and whites in Levels. Last step was adding a Curves Adjustment Layer and a little more contrast into the light colors (pulled down just a little on corner at 3 – 1 in grid). I really like the results – especially just a little of the red tones peaking through the greenery. I had not even noticed that in the original image.

Image of some yellow daisies painted with Topaz Impressions plug-inThese daisies were taken on the Living With the Land ride at Epcot in Disney World, Orlando, Florida. I just love yellow daisies! I wanted to create an image reminiscent of Van Gogh’s Tournesols (Sunflowers) image although a Van Gogh preset was not used, but instead the Impasto I preset. In Lightroom Seim’s (see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog for website link) Supertone EQ X preset and Hill and Lucas preset were applied. In Photoshop a little clean up was done to the edges and Topaz Impression plug-in was opened. These settings were changed in the preset: Stroke section: Brush Type 05 – for some reason I like this brush for the heavy painted look, Brush Size 0.61 – the larger the number the more painterly it looks, Paint Volume 0.76 – how see through is the effect, Stroke Width -0.34 – at +1 more of a scribble and -1 more realistic – I wanted a slightly realistic look here, Stroke Length 0.19, Spill 0.27 – set to 1 it will spill over the edge, Smudge 0.18 – I am using the very sparingly as it has a bit of the Oil Paint Filter look to it and I do not love that effect all the time, and Coverage 1.00 – do not care for the edging look at this time – if you reduce to less than +1 a Transition slider will appear; Color section Overall Saturation 0.17 and Lightness 0.06, Red Hue 0.29 and Saturation 0.10, Orange Saturation 01.0, Yellow Hue -0.10 and Saturation 0.11, and Green Hue 0.19; Lighting section Brightness 0, Contrast 0.92, and Vignette 0 – Light direction x-0.32 y0.60; and Texture section was left alone. After using the plug-in, I did a little clean up on a New Layer in areas that were a bit overdone, and added a Levels Adjustment Layer to bring back just a little contrast. The last step was on a stamped layer (CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+E) where Nik Viveza 2 was used to just saturate that middle flower a bit to draw the eye to it. This could just as easily be done using Camera Raw’s Radial Filter. It was a really fun working on this image.

What I have done is to go to the Users Manual which downloads with the plug-in (go to Help menu and it is there), and look at what they say each of the sliders do. I made a sheet with what Topaz says they do, and then what settings I like to use for them until I get used to what they do. Like I said, they have done a nice job of creating presets, so they do give you some nice starting places for adjusting your images. The Topaz team said they are continuing to work on adding to this plug-in, so it is great to know they are listening to their clients. That is one reason I love working with Topaz, their customer service is excellent. Impression is totally fun and very addictive – I could do this all day! If you have a chance, download it and see what you think. I will be writing a more thorough blog on this in the near future once I learned some tricks to get great effects. Still learning so better get back to it!…..Digital Lady Syd

Digital Lady Syd Related Blogs:
New Impression of Octopus and Seahorse


JUST PAINTING IN PHOTOSHOP AND HAVING FUN!

Image of totem poles in front of a store in St. Augustine, FloridaThis week is all about just having some fun painting – which is why I do anything in Photoshop! Thought I would pass along a few tips that occurred to me while painting away this week. This image is of some really beautiful wood totem poles that are in front of a store in St. Augustine, Florida. Had to take the image! The colors were marvelous!

This is an example of how to use your new brush skills to remove areas in your image – the texture was used to hide a very messy and distracting background and the basic objects were painted a little but kept in tact so you can appreciate the detail of the pieces. Since the last few posts have been about creating some nice brushes, this image used the one created for the first image in How to Paint with a Texture Brush blog. I like this brush because it contains a whole bunch of texture. If you want a more obvious texture in your brush, increase the Depth slider. What does this do? Well basically by setting to a high level, the deepest areas of the texture would not get any paint; set to 0% means that there really is no different between the high and low parts of the texture and very little of it will be seen in the brush stroke. The Depth Jitter adds some randomness to the brush texture in the stroke.

Lots of clean up was done before starting on this image – need to get any distractions out of the way and clone in areas that are covered up. Saves a lot of time later. In this case all the bottoms of the front totem poles had to be reconstructed and many had white sales tags on them. Note – Open up that Clone Stamp Panel and click on icon in front of the W – this reverses the direction of what you are cloning – totally useful to help with reconstructing a missing area. Added on top Melissa Gallo’s August Copper texture. By using a layer mask to paint back the totem poles, a pretty nice painterly effect is achieved. This is actually a very popular technique used whenever a texture is added. (See my Texture Resources – So Many Choices! So Many Choices! blog.)

Another tip is do not forget to try some of your plug-ins once you have got the image close to finished. I have often created much better results by doing this. This image used Nik Viveza 2 (one of my totally in-disposable plug-in) and Nik Analog Efex Pro 2 (another favorite) as a black and white layer and set to Overlay blend mode at 86%. Viveza let me make the faces a little sharper where I wanted to direct focus and add some slight vignetting in the corners. My last step involved adding yet another texture, August Marble also by Melissa, and setting it to a Color Burn blend mode at 52% layer opacity – and no layer mask this time.

So in this case we found that painting is not that much of the process – need to really clean up the image, use  your plug-ins wisely, and find a perfect texture to hide distractions! Always be on the look out for that great texture!
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Image of a painted bouquet of flowersThis bouquet is of an image I actually put a white background behind and shot with natural light. All that was done on this image is to just paint on a New Layer on top of the flowers using a Mixer brush. First Seim’s (see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog for website link) PW4 Super HDR X preset was added to add some contrast and sharpen the image a little. In Photoshop I converted the image to 8-bit (Image -> Mode -> 8 Bit) and made the image smaller since I was going to use a Mixer brush to paint and it is common knowledge that these brushes slows everything down – a lot! Usually this works along with keeping the brush size pretty small. This image just used Photoshop’s default Flat Fan Single Bristle Wet Edge brush at 25 pixels as a Mixer brush. The Options Bar was set so the “Load the brush after every stroke” icon was turned off – do not want to add any color – and Sample All Layers turned on. Set the Wet to 100%, Load 1%, Mix 100% (want to mix our colors up), and Flow 100%. I could have used the Very Wet Heavy Mix, in the drop down which increased the Load to 50% – not sure it matters at this point since no color is being loaded. Now just dabbed and stroked away to my hearts content on this image trying to keep my focal point in mind and not overdo that area. Two texture layers from French Kiss (see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog for website link) were added – the Atelier Valley set to Hard Light blend mode at 35% and Tableaux Mirage set to Vivid Light at 67% layer opacity – no layer masks were added. A New Layer was created and set to Overlay – then with a dark greenish brush set to 19% brush opacity, some of the lines in the flower were painted back to emphasize the separation in my focal area. (See my The Best Dodging and Burning Technique! blog.) Another New Layer was added where the Mixer brush was used to just add some extra strokes in the leaves – if the texture that was added is too strong, this can be blended into your strokes to make this less obvious. It just cleaned up some of the painting. A Curves Adjustment Layer was used to add back some of the contrast when the textures were added. A stamped layer was created and now I decided to go into Topaz ReStyle just to see if I could improved upon the color palette. The Thistles and Bright Sky preset was used (here are the setting if you are interested: ReStyle opacity 55%; Hue Secondary 0.30, Third 0.38, and Fifth 0.86; Lum Primary -0.33, Third -0.09, Fourth -0.33, and Fifth -o0.37; and Sat no changes; Texture 0.86; Basic Opacity 49% at Color blend mode; Color Tint -0.56 and Saturation 0.03; Tone Black Level 0.20 and Midtones -0.30; and Detail – Structure -0.42 and Sharpness 0.20.) Another Curves Adjustment Layer was added and by dragging in the focal flower area, more contrast could be added. By filling the layer mask with black, just this area was lightly painted back until it looked just right. It took a lot of steps but it ended up creating a very nice result! Used a similar process but different brush in my Tidbits Blog called Red Carnations on a Bright Sunny Texture.

Here’s a little tip I wanted to pass along – actually found this in the Photoshop Manual’s shortcut key section and it is a real time-saver when changing brushes. In the Preset Brush Panel pressing the “.” (period key) takes you to the next brush in the list and the “,” (comma key) takes you to the previous brush. You can skim through all your brushes very quickly by just pressing these keys. Also, by pressing the “<” key, you are taken to the first brush in your preset list and the “>” takes you to the last one. This is very handy since every time you create a new brush, it ends up at the bottom of the stack , and if you are like me, there can be many brushes in your list – so just press the > key and it takes you to the last entry quickly.

Well that’s it for this week. Maybe you picked up a couple new brushes or tips to try. See you next week!…..Digital Lady Syd


6 TIPS FOR PAINTING IN PHOTOSHOP

Image of Spring Flowers painted in PhotoshopI thought I would post a couple things I have learned while painting with Photoshop. FIRST TIP: Use texture to hide messy backgrounds. The image above was taken at the grocery store – used a texture to get rid of the distractions and added in a couple extra flowers to balance out the image using the Clone Stamp Tool and Free Transform. SECOND TIP: One of the things that is becoming more apparent to me as I go along is that any filters or software that you have at your disposal are okay to use to get a final image look you like. In this image, Topaz (for website see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog) Simplify’s Flat preset was used first to get a painterly effect started. One of my favorite textures – French Kiss Studio 3 White Wash texture – was added on top and the flowers were painted back an attached layer mask. You can also do the opposite, set the flowers on top of the texture and add a black layer mask to the flowers and paint the flowers back in. Either way, the texture helps get rid of the clutter in the background of the image. THIRD TIP: Add new layers above and paint in areas that need more color or harder lines to clean up an object. Try both the regular brushes and Mixer brushes – sometimes using a different brush than just the round ones adds some nice texture to the image. In this image some of the flower centers were painted in more clearly and the background was darkened slightly with a darker color taken from the vignette framing the image. FOURTH TIP: Use Adjustment Layers and fill the attached masks with black (CTRL+I inside the mask) and paint back only in areas to be emphasized by the adjustment. A Selective Color Adjustment Layer was used above to keep the yellow color from becoming too dominating – filled the mask with black and painted back selectively like the now less bright yellow daisies. FIFTH TIP: Create Vignettes on New Layer in any color. On a separate layer on top, a greenish color was sampled from the image and a soft vignette was painted around the edges to darken it slightly – set to Normal blend mode at 90% layer opacity. A layer mask can be set to paint out areas accidentally covered. And don’t forget trying different layer blend modes.
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Image of a painted Purple FlowerThe purple flower is one I painted for practice. In this case Topaz Adjust’s High Key II preset was used to sharpen up just the flower center – used a black mask and painted back just the center. This technique that can really take your images to the next level. By localizing your change, different effects can be made to look very pleasing yet not affect the whole image. SIXTH TIP: Use the Camera Raw Filter in Photoshop CC to help little adjustments, like color issues and vignettes. I usually convert the layer to a Smart Object before applying the filter to get back into it to adjust more if needed. Try this out – use  one radial filter to darken a little on the outside by setting the Exposure slider negative just a little. Now duplicate the Radial Filter by CTRL+ALT clicking on dot created by first Radial Filter, then hold down and drag just a little -now you have another one exactly the same size. Set it to Inside to bring out the color in the center of the image so the eye is drawn where you want it. In the case above the Clarity slider was moved left to give a slightly blurred background.

I like to use Topaz ReStyle with my painting images – it is the best Photoshop plug-in out there to find the best color combination for an image. Alien Skin’s Snap Art 4 and Topaz Clarity and Detail filters are also excellent when painting. Nik’s Analog Efex Pro gives some great results with painterly images – definitely a vintage feel to them. All these tips can help get your image looking very artistic. Hope you picked up a few ideas here to make your images look just a little more “painterly.”…..Digital Lady Syd

Digital Lady Syd Related Blogs:
Learning to Paint in Photoshop
A Few Painterly Tips
How to Use a Solid Fill Adjustment Layer
A Splash of Color
Painting the Old and the New