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Posts tagged “Topaz DeNoise

HOW TO HAND TINT A VINTAGE IMAGE AND CREATE A BRUSH TO DO THIS

Vintage image of ladies chatting at lunchLoved this vintage image from Shorpy.com, my favorite site for the old historical images, taken in 1902 at the National Cash Register Company‘s restaurant in Dayton, Ohio. I wonder what they are talking about? I found an older tutorial on hand-painting a vintage image and decided to share the technique. Previously I created a blog called How to Colorize an Old Photo blog using Solid Color Adjustments Layers, but this blog technique produces a more subtle hand-painting result. I guess this is why I have a hard time getting rid of my old resources – you never know when something will catch your eye!

Below are the basic steps to create this effect:

1.     This technique was found in a book called Special Effects – Restouching and Restoration by Tim Daly in the Chapter Restoring Hand Tints. Basically he suggest you scan your image, or in my case I downloaded an image from Shorpy’s – select an image that is more light-toned rather than dark-toned. As you can see in the original below, this fits the criteria. To lighten your image a little more, use a Levels Adjustment Layer and move the center tab called the Midtone slider so image is lighter.
Original Vintage Image of women from 1902Also, be sure to go to Image -> Image Size and check out the size and resolution of the image – the B&W above was set to a Resolution of 980 ppi and a Width of 0.837 inches and Height of 1.521 inches. The image was changed to a Width of 8 inches and a Height of 6.627 at a Resolution of 300 ppi.

2.     Next need to create a brush to use for adding the color tint. Open the Brush Engine (Windows -> Brush). Select a 45 px soft round brush. Down the side check the Buildup section – this turns on the Airbrush effect in the Options bar (or can just turn on the Airbrush icon in the Option Bar itself). Smoothing should be on in the Brush Panel. In the Options Bar, set the Mode to Color – this preserves the underlying image detail while painting. Set Opacity to 40% and Flow to 100% to start. At this point, I would definitely save the brush by clicking on the Create New Brush at the bottom of the brush Panel (it looks like a piece of paper with a bottom corner folded up). Since there are changes in the Options Bar, I also saved the brush as a Tool Preset – just go to the first (Brush) icon in the Options Bar, click on the down arrow next to it, and select Create New Tool Preset Icon and name it. The brush will now appear at the bottom of your list with the correct settings for both the Brush Panel and the Options Bar.

3.    Now the image should be turned to a sepia color, or whatever overall tint that is pleasing. For me a Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer was opened and the Colorize box was checked – the Hue was set to 27, Saturation 18, and Lightness +9. A stamped layer was created on top (CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+E) to incorporate the two adjustment layers, and the layer blend mode was changed to Color and the Layer Opacity can be lowered to taste.

4.   Time to paint using using the new brush. Open the Swatch Panel, select a color, and paint in your image – I painted directly on the image above, but individual layers for each color is a much better way to control the color shades (as done in the tint image below). If the color is too bold, reduce the Opacity and the Flow sliders of the brush in the Options Bar. Tim Daly recommended starting to tint with the smaller areas with similar colors first. In my image above, only the focal point area was painted.

That is all there is to it! Very fun and relaxing. To finish up, add your own effects to the image. In the above, on a New Layer a hatch texture was set added to the brush in the Brush Engine and it was set to Multiply blend mode. The table cloth was then painted to give it a little subtle pattern effect. This is where you can add some of your own creative ideas into the image. A Color Fill Adjustment Layer set to white was used to make the hatched brush texture really white. Adjustments Layers can add all kinds of interesting effects to these tinted images. This image also used Topaz (see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog for website link) Texture Effects – based upon their Crisp Morning Run preset. Just added the oval Border and a white Color Overlay with a low 0.31 opacity.

TIP FOR WORKING WITH VINTAGE GRANULATED IMAGES: You might notice that some of the vintage images have a lot of grain in them, especially in the shadows. A great way to remove this problem is to use a Noise Reduction filter, then add a black layer mask and paint back over just the really obvious areas where the noise is bad. In the above, the faces had a lot of noise. Topaz DeNoise 6 was used, but Nik’s Dfine plug-in which is now free, or Photoshop’s Camera Raw filter-the Detail Section could be as effective. Just adjust to where the really noisy areas look good even if the whole image gets blurry. By adding a black mask (CTRL+I in the white mask) to this layer and using a very low opacity regular soft round brush, paint with white back in the really noisy areas.
Color Tinted Image of the Raleigh Hotel, Miami, FL in 1941Thought I would show you what a landscape type image looks like color-tinted. This image is of the Raleigh Hotel in Miami Beach, Florida on March 4, 1941. I think one of the reasons I am enjoying this technique is that it gives me a chance to really look at the image and see a story in it. To me this is really fun – and it gives a vintage postcard effect to the image. I look at all the people at this resort back during WWII and wonder who these people are – and this hotel is still very popular. What is also interesting about this image is that it is not all hand tinted – mainly just the foreground area has been painted in. Below is the original image so you can see what can be done with this type of image.

Original Raleigh Hotel image from Shorpy

Instead of a sepia tone image to begin the process, this one used a cyan-toned tint. Since the image detail is rather obscure the further back one looks, it is not so noticeable that the color is missing. In fact, the palm trees in the center back were actually lightened a little by clipping a New Layer on their layers where the color was applied and light dots of white were applied to softly blend them into the background just a little. Also after painting this image, Topaz Glow was used to make the tint colors stronger in the image – the cyan was to be the main color since it reminds me of resorts and warm water. Topaz Lens Effects was used to add a slight Golden Reflector effect from the right side to play on the palm tree fronds and a very soft cyan vignette was placed around the image as a last step. This image used 22 layers for the different colors and objects. Several mistakes were made using the wrong color and it was easy to just clip (ALT+click between the layers or click on the first icon at the bottom of the panel) a Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer to the layer and change the color to match perfectly. Therefore I would recommend using separate layers for colors. And do create the brush – it is very useful for this technique!

Hope you give this a try on one of your scanned black and white images or an old vintage image. Lots of fun here!  Have a great week!…..Digital Lady Syd

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A NEW LOOK AT CHROMATIC ABERRATION

Image of the Carousel at Jacksonville ZooThought I would share a tip that can really improve your photos, especially landscapes. Wikipedia says “Chromatic aberration manifests itself as “fringes” of color along boundaries that separate dark and bright parts of the image.” This seems to be very apparent in blue skies in landscapes with lots of trees. The above image was taken at the Jacksonville Zoo of a vintage-looking carousel (see my Only in Florida! Tidbits Blog for a closer look). Just a few Basic panel adjustments Lens Corrections (checking just the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration boxes) were done in Lightroom before opening up Photoshop.

This technique was passed along by one of my favorite Photoshop people, Blake Rudis (who says he learned it from Steve Perry), at his f64 Academy in a video called The Color Blend Mode – there is a free downloadable action here to do this technique. The image had some empty branches against the blue sky along with was some real blue-cyan chromatic aberration. In Lightroom the Remove Chromatic Aberration checkbox did not remove this and to be honest, I did not  notice it until I was in Photoshop since only the upper corners were affected. Below it can be seen what a subtle difference the technique makes – you can definitely see the cyan color shift due to the Chromatic Aberration in the sky. It is hard to see, but the branches on the right side image look a bit darker and sharper, especially where the larger branches are present. This was also true on the upper left side of the image.

Image showing with and without Chromatic Aberration

So here are my steps to get rid of this ugly blue edging in this case but it will work on any color of chromatic aberration.

  1. Duplicate the Background layer (CTRL+J) and turn it into a Smart Object by right clicking on the layer text area and selecting Convert to Smart Object. A stamped layer (CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+E) could be used and duplicated if in the middle of post-processing.
  2. Go to Filter -> Blur -> Gaussian Blur and set the Radius somewhere between 6 and 20. I used 6.8 for this image.
  3. Change the layer blend mode to Color – now the whole image is blurred.
  4. Click in the Smart Filter layer mask and CTRL+I to turn it black. With a regular soft round brush, paint with white just in the areas you want the blur to correct the chromatic aberration.

Blake does not use a Smart Object, just applies the filter and adds a black layer mask – then paints back areas that need correction. This technique also works if the chromatic aberration is not completely removed when using the Camera Raw filter. What is really useful is that this is a localized correction and only affects the part of the image that needs the correction. The Blur does not affect the whole image! I find this gives a very subtle and sharp result to the bad areas. Here is a link to one of my Tidbits Blogs called  Defringe that Nasty Blue Edge from Trees On a Bright Blue Sky! done a while ago where 4 other ways to remove Chromatic Aberration are presented if you would like to try out some other techniques.

There were lots of steps used for final processing in this image – Topaz (see sidebar at my Tidbits Blog for website link) Glow, Topaz DeNoise, Photo Filter Adjustment Layer, Vignette, and clean up layers. Overall I was pretty happy with the final results.

Give this Chromatic Aberration trick a go, especially if you have cyan blue going around those branches in trees. It works really great! Also check out Blake’s f64 Academy website as he has lots of great ideas on improving pictures. Well, back to my organizing until next week…..Digital Lady Syd